The 8D Association



The Liverpool and Manchester.

There have been 32 stations on the line since it opened on
15th September 1830.


Liverpool Lime Street.

Opened in 1836 and enlarged in 1845 - 51 the station is still a grand terminus today.The ugly 1960's shops built at the front have recently been demolished and this has given the station some of its character back. Work is due to commence on 30th September 2017 to provide two extra platforms, on the site of the cab road, and extending some existing platforms. The upgrade work is expected to be complete by 2019 and, it is hoped, direct services to Glasgow and Edinburgh will be re-introduced. It will be the largest improvement works at the station since the 1845 - 51 extension was constructed.


45 108 stands under the impressive train shed at Lime Street opened in 1851 it was the largest of its type at the time. The loco is hauling the 12:03 train to Scarborough on the final weekend
of Class 45 booked haulage.
9th May 1987.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.


Probably the cleanest Black 5 in the country on this day
45156 ' Ayrshire Yeomanry ' stands at Lime Street. This
engine was one of only four to carry a name and it was the
last of the four to survive. Allocated to Edge Hill at the time,
it was later moved to 24B Rose Grove, and lasted until the
end of steam operation in August 1968. It was cut up by
Wards of Beighton in December of the same year. 

20th April 1968.
Photo by Les Fifoot.


Having worked Empty Coaching Stock from Edge Hill 45287 is seen at the
buffer stops in Liverpool Lime Street.
20th April 1968.
Photo by Les Fifoot.


Since the demolition of the 1960's shops which obscured the frontage of Lime Street for forty years the true beauty of the station has been revealed.
28th January 2013.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.

Edge Hill.

With the opening of Lime Street Edge Hill lost its role as the Liverpool Terminus. This role can still be seen today though in the impressive 1830's station that survives. Virtually unchanged from then it is now one of the oldest railway stations in the country. The original station had opened with the commencement of passenger services on 17th September 1830. This station was rebuilt and the present one opened around 15th August 1836 and has now been functioning as a station for over 175 years. In recent years the station has suffered, considerably, from a lack of basic maintenance especially at platform level with weeds taking over much of the surfaces and on the track itself.


Seen passing through platform 3 is 81011 with a single MK3 coach in tow.
The station approach can be seen through the gate to the right.
June 1989.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.



47 406 is seen passing through platform 1 with a Trans Pennine service.
Most of the sidings to the right of the loco had been lifted by this date.
February 1988.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.


The extensive sidings to the north of the station still remained visible at this date with 
raifreight liveried Class 31 entering with a ballast train. The length of the platforms are 
evident in this shot and the bay platform to the left which housed D200 for a period has
recently been lifted.
June 1988.
Photo by Terry Callaghan. 


The ticket office building on platforms 1 and 2 is of a solid sandstone construction and would have been an impressive terminus in its day. Opened by 15th August 1836 these are now some of the oldest railway buildings in the country still being used for the purpose for which they were built.
21st February 2013.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.


The sadly now disused buildings on platforms 3 and 4 are well looked after and are as equally impressive as the ones on platforms 1 and 2.
21st February 2013.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.


The two island platforms of Edge Hill were supplied with an access ramp each both of which are cobbled. This is the now disused ramp which gave access to platforms 3 and 4.
21st February 2013.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.


The extent to which Northern have allowed standards at Edge HIll station to slip are graphically illustrated in this shot of 319 365, resplendent in its fresh Northern livery, departs a somewhat scruffy Edge Hill, the oldest continually used passenger station in the world.
25th July 2015.
Photo by Nigel Capelle.

To view Nigel's extensive Flickr photostream click here 


Wavertree Technology Park.

Opened in 2000 at a cost of £ 2 million the station takes its name from the business park which it serves. The park was built on the site of the former coal concentration depot. The station has a frequent Manchester and Wigan service.


Wavertree Technology Park is situated in a cutting and can be accessed from the technology park itself or from Rathbone Road. The modern ticket office can be seen in the centre of the bridge.
21st February 2013.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.


Sprinter 150143 pauses at the station with a service for Lime Street.
21st February 2013.
Photo by Robert Callaghan.

Broad Green.

Broad Green station opened with the commencement of passenger services on 17th September 1830 and first appeared in timetables on 1st March 1831. The station was rebuilt by the LNWR when the line was quadrupled from Liverpool to a point east of Huyton station. A massive change for the station occurred in the 1970's with the construction of the M62 motorway close by. The station was rebuilt and reduced from four platform faces to two. A new ticket office was constructed in a 'modern' style and this is the station that we see today. On 5th March 2015 electric services began running between Liverpool and Manchester Airport and by 2016 all services were booked to be Class 319 units.


The 1970's ticket office of Broad Green stands on the location of platforms 1 and 2 of the LNWR station. With the re quadrupling of the line from a point west of the station to Huyton it will become a pinch point on the system and there is no room for widening of the trackbed at this point.
21st February 2013.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.


The platforms at Broad Green with the M62 flyover visible in the background which occupies part of the original station site.
21st February 2013.
Photo by Robert Callaghan.


An aptly named Super Sprinter 156441 called at the station with a service bound for Manchester.
21st February 2013.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.


The bricked up subway which used to run through to the old platforms 1 and 2.
21st February 2013.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.

Roby.

Roby opened with the commencement of passenger services on 17th September 1830 and appeared in the timetables from 1st March 1831. The station was totally rebuilt by the LNWR with the quadrupling of the line but was reduced to two platforms when the line was reduced to two tracks. The unused platforms were infilled and the subway access was bricked up. In early 2015 the unused platforms had been re-instated and the double track formation laid throughout from Roby to Huyton station. 5th March 2015 saw the introduction of some electric services through the station with one of the two new lines brought into use. The second of the new lines will be available once work is completed east of Huyton station possibly as early as autumn 2017. 


The LNWR ticket office and waiting room part of which is in use as a private residence.
21st February 2013.
Photo by Robert Callaghan.




The bricked up access to platforms 3 and 4 at Roby. Within the next few years this wall will be removed and the subway will be brought back into use to access platforms 3 and 4.
21st February 2013.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.


The original subway steps to platform 4 have recently been exposed and are being used to excavate the rubble in the old subway.
21st February 2013.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.


The pile of bricks to the right have been excavated fro the subway and the original platform 3 can be seen to the left. The overbridge in the background has been rebuilt in conjunction with the electrification project currently on going.
21st February 2013.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.

Huyton.

Another of the original 1830's stations although reconstructed since then the 'new' buildings are still old and have some interesting features. One being that some of the stone is actually the stone sleepers from the original line.The buildings seen today are from the LNWR rebuilding period. The station was originally called Huyton Lane Gate but was known as Huyton Lane by 1839 with the Lane part of the name being gradually dropped by the LNWR around 1852. By late 2014 the first of the two new lines was brought into use with Huyton bus station and the BT exchange blocking the path of the second new line; during late 2016 work started on moving the bus station and exchange to allow the line to be constructed.


A Class 31 hauls a failed Class 47 and stock through Huyton Station the main station
building is looking a little dilapidated but has since been refurbished.
1987.
Photo by Terry Callaghan. 



45117 passing the signal box at the west end of the Eastbound platform of Huyton to the
right of the signal box would have been another pair of lines which directly to 
the east of the station would have formed the line to Wigan.
1986.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.


Departing from Huyton on a dismal Sunday afternoon is 142055 this was once the level
crossing at the east end of the station which was replaced with a pedestrian subway.
The semaphore signals are now a distant memory being swept away by colour lights.
1987.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.


The main building of Huyton station is still functioning as a ticket office and waiting room. Sadly though it is only staffed on a part time basis.
21st February 2013.
Photo by Robert Callaghan.


The two surviving platforms have handled all traffic since the 1960's. Platforms 3 and 4 were located behind the black fence and are currently being excavated to bring them back into use.
21st February 2013.
Photo by Robert Callaghan.


Huyton subway will have the end wall removed in conjunction with bringing platforms 3 and 4 back into use.
21st February 2013.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.


With the end wall removed the subway is back to its pre-1970s. The first aperture on the left is where the end wall is in the previous picture.
18th October 2014.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.



The view west from Huyton station with the two new lines in place, far right, masts were in the process of being erected with the third line from the left already in use.
18th October 2014.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.



Huyton Quarry.

Directly to the east of the junction with the Wigan line was the station of Huyton Quarry. It opened with the commencement of the passenger service on 17th September 1830 as Bottom of Whiston Incline but was renamed Huyton Quarry by November 1837. The station was to close 10 years after nationalisation of the railways on 15th September 1958 just two days short of its 128 year anniversary.


The site of Huyton Quarry station today. The site has recently been cleared to house one of the new electrical feeder stations, but no trace of the eastbound platform is visible.
21st February 2013.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.


The only evidence of a station ever being sited here is this small piece of wall from the westbound platform and the railway house situated behind it.
21st February 2013.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.

Whiston.

Opened in October 1990 Whiston has been another of the lines success stories with high passenger numbers and a frequent service between Liverpool, Manchester and Warrington. The station has ample car parking and a regular bus sevice.


The ticket office of Whiston station is of the usual modern design as are the brick built waiting shelters.
21st February 2013.
Photo by Robert Callaghan.


The platforms are quite lengthy and are of a lightweight concrete build.
21st February 2013.
Photo by Robert Callaghan.

Rainhill.

A station famous in its own right mainly for the Rainhill Trials which were held here to determine the type of traction to be used on the worlds first inter city railway. Nearly as famous is the skew bridge which stands at the west end of the platform and is definitely worth a look. Fittingly British Rail decided that the final booked passenger steam services should run along this line and through this historic station.


One or two of the locals turned out on this day to see the 15 Guinea Specials working
along the Liverpool to Manchester line. It is clear to see what the end of main line
steam working meant to them. Also of note in the background is the goods 
shed of the station with the signal box behind it.
11th August 1968.
Photo by Les Fifoot.


The charming and well presented ticket office and waiting room of Rainhill station.
21st February 2013.
Photo by Robert Callaghan.


The platforms are as usual lengthy which could accommodate far longer trains than the usual 2 or 4 car Sprinters which now serve the station.
21st February 2013.
Photo by Robert Callaghan.


The famous Skew bridge at the west end of the station.
21st February 2013.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.


The inscription in the bridge naming the Chairman of the railway and the resident engineer.
21st February 2013.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.

Lea Green.

Lea Green station has stood on two sites in the past 180 years the first being a mile or so from Rainhill which opened on 1st March 1831. It had staggered platforms either side of the road over bridge that is Lowfield Lane. The station closed to passengers on 7th March 1955 and finally to goods on 15th September 1958. The station platforms were totally demolished and no trace remains the station masters house which stood in the station yard opposite the westbound platform still survives as a private residence. The new station opened on 17th September 2000 at a new site around ½ mile further east adjacent to Marshalls Cross Road and with its large car park and good bus links it is a very busy station today.


31 203 passes the site of Lea Greens first station the westbound platform would
have been to the right of the loco. The rather cluttered station yard can be seen.
1989.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.



The platforms of the new Lea Green station. The original bridge for Marshall Cross Road at the east end of the platform is now ready for the wire to pass underneath it.
21st February 2013.
Photo by Robert Callaghan.


The ticket office is located at ground level adjacent to platform 2.
21st February 2013.
Photo by Robert Callaghan.


A diverted Virgin Trains Pendolino set runs through Lea Green station, with the electrification showing that when the line via Ditton is closed trains, instead of buses, can still be run with minimal delay to the travelling public.
3rd May 2015.
Photo by Jamie Callaghan.



St Helens Junction.

Opened around 1833 the station has contracted over the years with now only two platform faces the bay platforms on either side of the station were taken out of use many years ago. The station still has its LNWR buildings on the eastbound platform and the station masters house is in use as the station cafe. Since the line to Sutton Oak was lifted in the late 1980's the station is no longer a junction but still retains the suffix. Wires and masts now stretch through the station with electric passenger services having commenced on 5th March 2015.


St Helens Junction looking towards Manchester, the original buildings on platform 2 have been replaced by the bus shelter type. In the distance the steam locomotive which used to shunt the sidings of Bold Power Station and colliery can be seen at work.
1st December 1976.
Photo by John Tolson. Reproduced with permission from The Sankey Canal Restoration Society.
 To view the societies website click here


A large logo liveried Class 47 arrives at St Helens Junction with a Trans Pennine service.
The fresh ballast to the rear of the train is where the junction to Sutton Oak has 
been removed.
1987.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.


On a misty day a diverted 253045 HST to Liverpool Lime St passes through St Helens Junction.
 These were regular diversions due to engineering work on the line via Runcorn.
 To the right of the train are the chimneys of Bold power station which dominated
the local skyline for many years.
 
1988.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.


St Helens Junction as it is today the bay platform for the St Helens Shaw Street service was
to the right of the main building and the platform face can still be seen. The view here 
will change with the electrification of the line which is currently on going.
4th August 2012.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.


The first day of electric services saw 319 363 being one of the two units used for the Manchester Airport service, seen here standing at St Helens Junction.
5th March 2015.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.


Collins Green.

A station which first appeared in the timetable on 1st March 1831 it was a small station with two platform faces which served a small community. The station was closed by British Rail on 2nd April 1951 giving it a life of just over 120 years.


The site of Collins Green station no trace remains of the station and it is hard to believe one ever existed here.
23rd February 2013.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.

Earlestown.


The station opened with the commencement of passenger services on 17th September 1830 and appeared as Viaduct station in the timetable of 1st March 1831. It was first listed in Bradshaw as Newton Junction and by 1852 had changed to Warrington Junction by 1861 it was being known as Earlestown junction until 5th June 1950 when the suffix was dropped. It is an interesting station mainly due to it having the original 'Tudor style' buildings on platform 2. These are sadly no longer in use but were cleaned and refurbished externally for the Rainhill Cavalcade in the 1980's. Also of interest is the layout of the station it is formed of a large triangle with junctions in the west and east towards Winwick. The Westbound cut off platforms were lightly used for many years, although  recently one of these has been brought back into use for Liverpool to Warrington trains as a bi-directional line. The station is well served with trains to Liverpool, Manchester, Chester and beyond along the North Wales coast.


A great close up picture of the Mock Tudor main buildings on platforms 2 & 3. The cut off lines to Warrington can be seen running to the right of the building with the goods lines behind platform 4. An interesting feature of the canopy on the Liverpool Manchester line is the addition of glass panels presumably to allow some light to platform level. The position of these panels can be seen in the next picture.
May 1963.
From the D K Jones collection.
Supplied by t i a transport image archive via their ebay shop.


31 145 seen heading towards Liverpool with an engineers spoil train. At the end of the 
Manchester platform where the white fence is was the location of the flat crossing
seen in the picture on the main L & M page of the site. The station car park seen
top left with my Dads blue Escort in it was the carriage sidings.
April 1987.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.


45 111 Grenadier Guardsman was only a couple of weeks away from withdrawl when it was 
photographed taking the connecting spur towards Winwick with the 15:50 service to
London Euston the mock tudor buildings are being attended to by the local 
Fire Brigade as they were on fire when we arrived at the station that day.
April 1987.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.


45130 hauls another diverted service along the spur towards Winwick these platforms were 
numbers three and four originally but when the service between Warrington and St Helens
Shaw Street was withdrawn they were closed. The old platform three has since
been re-opened.
April 1987.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.


The LNWR built ticket office at the entrance to platform 1.
23rd February 2013.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.

The sadly unused but well maintained buildings on platforms 2 and 3.
23rd February 2013.
Photo by Robert Callaghan.


A close up shot of the platform buildings end window showing the detail of the stonework.
23rd February 2013.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.


Platform 3 has recently been brought back into use for trains to Warrington Bank Quay and is a bi-directional line. The island platform to the right is still unused.
23rd February 2013.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.


Platforms 4 and 5 were the Grand Junction platforms for services to the north and London. These services stopped calling here when the cut off line from Winwick Junction to Golbourne Junction was completed this accelerated timings for the London to Scotland express services.
23rd February 2013.
Photo by Robert Callaghan.

Newton Le Willows.

The station opened with the commencement of passenger services on 17th September 1830 and was called simply Newton the station was renamed Newton Le Willows on 14th June 1888. With some of the best preserved early railway buildings which date from 1840. The station was once a main calling point for the Anglo Scottish express trains to make connections with Liverpool and Manchester this all ended with the opening of the cut off line via Red Bank. The station still had an important role though as a Motor Rail terminal for many years and evidence of this can still be seen today. Another railway link is McCorquodales the printers adjacent to the station which printed copies of Bradshaw and latterly timetables for British Rail. Network Rail announced plans in 2016 for the 'transformation' of the station including a new booking hall to the south of the line with extra car parking spaces, a bus interchange, new subway, toilet facilities and step free access to the platforms. No mention was made as to what would happen with the existing building on the north side of the line.


The forecourt and well preserved ticket office of Newton Le Willows.
23rd February 2013.
Photo by Robert Callaghan.


The buildings at platform level.
23rd February 2013.
Photo by Robert Callaghan.


An unusual feature is the stations subway with a window in the end wall.
23rd February 2013.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.


A replica of the tablet from the Huskisson memorial is at the top of the access stairs for platform 1.
23rd February 2013.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.


One of our younger members standing on the Motorrail loading ramp still present, with track and signals, which is situated on the old east bound bay platform.
23rd February 2013.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.


Parkside 1st site.

Immediately after passing the junction to Preston and the North would have stood the first Parkside station. Infamous for being the place of the opening day accident which claimed the life of William Huskisson M.P. a memorial can be seen close to the station site from passing trains. The station here opened with the line in 1830 but had a short life for passengers being closed in 1839. The station did remain open as a luggage station but was closed by 1st May 1878 when the second station closed.


Taken from the Thomas Berry prints commissioned for publicity purposes by the owners of the Liverpool and Manchester Railway. The picture was re issued in the form of an LNWR postcard. Entitled Railways in the Thirties it shows the rudimentary facilities provided for passengers at Parkside station with a Rocket style loco taking on water at the station.
November 1904.
From the Terry Callaghan collection.


31 196 passing the site of the first Parkside station with an engineers train. The area
to the left of the track was used for carriage sidings until the late 60's.
1986.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.


Parkside 2nd site. 

Opened in 1839 to replace the first station the second was only a matter of a few hundred yards east of the first. This was due to the new cut off line from the West Coast eastbound toward Manchester therefore more trains could call there. With the station being situated in an area with a low population there was never any real chance of it generating much traffic and it was closed on 1st May 1878.


58 042 Ironbridge Power Station is seen hauling a Pathfinders Railtour past the
site of the second Parkside station
22nd June 1987.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.

This concludes the stations within the ten mile radius of 8D shed more information of the other stations on the line towards Manchester is available on the main
  LNWR Liverpool to Manchester page of the site.






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