The 8D Association




Stations miscellaneous page.

These are stations in the 10 mile radius of 8d shed upon lines not covered in the individual pages.

Allerton.

Opened by the St Helens and Runcorn Gap Railway on 15th February 1864. The station found itself on the main line to London after the completion of the Ditton Junction to Weaver Junction line by the LNWR and was rebuilt in the 1950's in conjunction with the electrification of the Liverpool to Crewe section. Being on such a line the station enjoyed a good service until the 1970's. The station had four platform faces with buildings of a similar style to the others reconstructed along the line. Merseytravel looked at the site and decided to construct an interchange station on the site to allow passengers to change to Merseyrail Electrics or to go on a bus shuttle service to John Lennon airport. So the station was closed on 30th July 2005.
  

A Class 31/4 on a Norwich to Liverpool service passes through platform 2 at Allerton. The station had taken on an air of neglect by this point. Compare this picture with the Liverpool South Parkway picture as they are both taken from approximately the same spot.
1987.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.


A Class 86 on a London Euston express is about to pass through platform 1
1987.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.


Delamere.

Opened by the Cheshire Lines Committee on 22nd June 1870 the station is still functioning today. It is now an unstaffed halt but had over 34,000 journeys either to or from the station in 2010/11. The platform buildings still survive and have been used on a commercial basis for several years. The station serves the village of Delamere and is situated on the edge of Delamere Forest. Which is still a popular attraction for families.


A well turned out 5305 is seen passing through Delamere station on a railtour. An old bay platform probably for goods can be seen to the right of the platform fencing.
Mid 1980's
Photo by Les Fifoot.


Derby built 108 DMU 51417 and 52412 are seen arriving at Delamere station with a Sunday service for Chester. The main station building was being used for the sale of Christmas trees and the stone built waiting shelter is also still in use.
6th December 1987.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.

Liverpool South Parkway.

Opened on the 11th June 2006 on the site of the former Allerton station Liverpool South Parkway was built as a major interchange station. Physically connecting for the first time the ex CLC line and the city line, with the building of low level platforms which and a connection with John Lennon Airport via a bus link. The station was a major step forward for the system with integrated transport between rail and road all under one roof.


The station is of a very modern design which is very accessible and light and airy. A Class 156 pauses to collect passengers. Compare this picture with the Allerton picture showing the Class 31 they are both taken from approximately the same location.
28th January 2013.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.

Mossley Hill.

Opened on its original site by the LNWR on 15th February 1864 the station was re-sited to the north by the same company on 13th July 1891. It had been renamed Mossley Hill for Aigburth in the late 1870's and was to remain so until it reverted back to Mossley HIll on 6th May 1974 when British Rail changed its name. The station was rebuilt in the 1960's in conjunction with the Crewe to Liverpool Lime Street electrification in the style of Ditton Junction and Allerton. As both of these other sites have subsequently closed it is the final example of 1960's forward thinking.


The street 
level buildings at Mossley Hill are now showing signs of their age but they are a reminder of the style of station design in the 1960's.
28th January 2013.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.


The station was furnished with four long platforms on two islands, there was also a large goods yard and shed which were beyond platform 4 and are currently being redeveloped.
28th January 2013.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.


The stopping service along the line now consists of Pacers and Sprinters on the service to Manchester Piccadilly. In years gone by it was always the Crewe to Liverpool stopping trains which called here. Pacer 142052 is seen calling to pick up a handful of passengers.
28th January 2013.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.

West Allerton.

Opened by the LMS on 2nd January 1939 to capture the ever expanding commuter market the station was built to a modern design. When many others along the line were rebuilt in conjunction with the electrification project it is considered that West Allerton was seen as already being modern and thus did not require rebuilding. The station was therefore left in an as built condition and is unique today.


The street level building at West Allerton. They are of a lightweight brick and wooden construction which to be honest have stood the test of time well.
28th January 2013.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.


West Allerton was provided with four platform faces with a centre island. The platforms are lengthy as was the style at the time of building.
28th January 2013.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.


One of the builders plates on the footbridge.
28th January 2013.
Photo by Terry Callaghan.








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